Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Program

MaPregnant Womanke a difference in your child’s life

You may be eligible for nutrition education, breastfeeding information, and healthy foods provided by your local WIC clinic.

WIC may be able to help you if you…

  • Are pregnant or breastfeeding
  • Have an infant or children up to age 5
  • Are working with limited income or have no income
  • Want to improve your family's health with good nutrition

WIC provides healthy foods such as:

  • milk
  • eggs
  • cheese
  • peanut butter
  • fruits
  • vegetables
  • juice
  • cereal
  • dry beans or peas
  • iron-fortified infant formula
  • infant fruit/vegetables/meats (jars)
  • infant cereal
  • 100% whole wheat bread
  • brown rice
  • corn tortillas

What is WIC?

Even if you or your family members are working, it can be hard to make ends meet. The Women, infants and Children Program (WIC) may be able to help with the right food and advice on nutrition, health care, and immunizations.

WIC is the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children. It is administered in Illinois by the Department of Human Services (DHS) and is funded by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

WIC is a federal nutrition program that provides:

  • Nutrition Education
  • Nutrition Counseling
  • Breastfeeding Support
  • Breastpump Rental
  • Nutritious Foods
  • Referrals to Other Services

WIC helps parents to feed their children properly during critical periods of growth and development. The combination of nutrition education, nutritious foods, and yearly health care visits strengthens families long after their WIC eligibility has ended.

Call your WIC clinic and schedule an appointment today. The phone number for WIC in Kankakee County is 815-802-9300.

To find out more about WIC and the clinic nearest you, call (800) 323-GROW (4769) (Voice and TTY).

Are you eligible for WIC?

Three factors must be met:

Category
You must be:
  • A pregnant woman or breastfeeding up to one year after giving birth;
  • A new mother, up to six months after giving birth; or
  • A parent, guardian or caretaker who has an infant or child younger than 5 years of age.
Income
  • Your annual household income must be within the WIC Income Guidelines.
  • You may have a job and still meet these guidelines (For example, a family of four can earn $42,643).
Medical or Nutrition Health Risk
A screening by a WIC Certifying Health Professional must find that you have a medical or nutritional health risk such as low iron, low weight gain during pregnancy, or inadequate diet.

For more than 25 years…

…the WIC program has been helping mothers, babies and children get the foods they need for proper growth and development.

At your first WIC clinic, please bring the following with you:

Identification
Example: Driver’s license, photo ID
Proof of pregnancy
Positive pregnancy test
Proof of income
Your last two paycheck stubs, income tax form, Medicaid or Food Stamp ID, or KidCare card.
Proof of residency
Example: your utility bill or recent mail
Proof of birth
Birth certificate for your infant or child
Proof of immunizations
Shot records

WIC does not require proof of citizenship or alien status

In accordance with federal law and U.S. Department of Agricultural policy, this instituition is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, Room 326-W, Whitten Building, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C., 20250-9410 or call (202) 720-5946 (voice and TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity employer.

WIC supports every mother’s choice to breastfeed.